Connecting Europe at the EA Campus 16

What makes the Campus of European Alternatives relevant is its capacity to help activists  exchange, reflect and strategise how the transnational alternatives could look like. We lack the spaces of direct and personal exchange with different realities and this is what we aimed to create and give everyone the opportunity to join in at this Campus.

Natalia is a Polish activist who develops open source technologies to help exchanging knowledge and building community; Katerina is a Greek activist based in Vienna researching and mapping activists and citizens working to change their realities; Julia is from Ukraine, she is a dramaturge, and works with her theatre company to make a political impact in her country; Eleonora is an Italian activist that became the city councillor in Naples; Lucas is a media maker from Sevilla and his cultural platform promotes social innovation through culture.

Last week, the five of them connected at the Campus of European Alternatives, which lasted for 3,5 days together, taking place a couple of hours from the centre of Berlin in the countryside of North-Eastern Germany.

The campus of European Alternatives brought together 80 activists from different parts of Europe to exchange, reflect and strategise together on how to build transnational alternatives to politics as usual.

This is what the Campus participants worked towards during those intense days: alternative media developed cooperations to shift perspectives and the narrative of Europe, city representatives and citizens initiatives looked for ways to connect the municipal with the transnational level, activist network coordinators developed strategies to build their strength against neo-liberals and nationalists, and ‘artivists’ reflected on practices of transnational artistic expression to shift the imaginary of Europe in a possible future common action.

pic by Marco Casino

pic by Marco Casino

What makes the Campus of European Alternatives relevant is its capacity to help activists  exchange, reflect and strategise how the transnational alternatives could look like. We lack the spaces of direct and personal exchange with different realities and this is what we aimed to create and give everyone the opportunity to join in at this Campus.

“Break the bubble” were the words that many participants were telling to each other: break the bubble, look around you, and find synergies with those trying to change their realities. It is also a call to the organisers for being better in reaching out and including diverse communities. Being inclusive and understanding who is speaking for whom are at the basis of any progressive plan for the Europe we want to see.

The outcomes of the individual workstreams will be made available very soon. We are working on the follow-up, including a publication summarising the main points of the workstreams and proposals for upcoming opportunities and meetings.

pic by Marco Casino

pic by Marco Casino

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